Math Dyslexia = Dyscalculia
This Calculus homework is making me sick to my stomach

likesharksiwillrise:

Like really. I’m not going to finish it, just because I honestly can’t. I don’t have whatever clicks in your brain to make it work. I can’t even put the wrong answers down.

I still need to work up the courage to tell my parents that I think I have dyscalculia.

Nobody knows what it is though. I don’t think it’s in the DSM IV, so my dad won’t have any knowledge of it.

It IS in DSM-IV! And WHO ICD 10. In the same categories as dyslexia. It’s real alright, even brain scans have shown proof of abnormalities in people with dyscalculia. Still very unknown, but very very real. 

DSM-IV 315.1
Mathematics Disorder

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, otherwise known as DSM, is the standard classification of mental disorders used by mental health professionals in the United States and some countries in the Western world. It is published by the American Psychiatric Association. This is the official listing of dyscalculia in the DSM-IV;

Students with a mathematics disorder have problems with their math skills. Their math skills are significantly below normal considering the student’s age, intelligence, and education.

As measured by a standardized test that is given individually, the person’s mathematical ability is substantially less than you would expect considering age, intelligence and education. This deficiency materially impedes academic achievement or daily living. If there is also a sensory defect, the mathematics deficiency is worse than you would expect with it.

Associated Features:
Conduct disorder
Attention deficit disorder
Depression
Other Learning Disorders

Differential Diagnosis:
Some disorders have similar or even the same symptoms. The clinician, therefore, in his/her diagnostic attempt, has to differentiate against the following disorders which need to be ruled out to establish a precise diagnosis.

Low Self-Esteem
Social problems
Increased dropout rate at school

Cause:
Mathematics disorder is usually brought to the attention of the child’s parents when math instruction becomes a very important part of the classroom teaching. It is possible that some people have problems in math because of their genetic makeup. In contrast to some families whose members have great difficulty solving math problems, there are other families who tend to have members that consistently have a very high-level of math functioning.

Treatment:
Treatment for mathematics disorder includes individual tutoring, placement in special math classrooms with expert math teachers, and other educational aids that focus on math skills. Therefore, learning disorders are treated with specialized educational methods. In addition to special classroom instruction at school, students with learning disorders frequently benefit from individualized tutoring which focuses on their specific learning problem

——

WHO ICD 10 F81.2
Specific disorder of arithmetical skills

ICD - The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems lists descriptions of know diseases and injuries, and health professionals all over the world use the manual to diagnose patients. It is published by WHO - The World Health Organization. This is the official listing of dyscalculia in ICD 10;

Involves a specific impairment in arithmetical skills that is not solely explicable on the basis of general mental retardation or of inadequate schooling. The deficit concerns mastery of basic computational skills of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division rather than of the more abstract mathematical skills involved in algebra, trigonometry, geometry, or calculus.

Developmental:
acalculia
arithmetical disorder
Gerstmann’s syndrome

Excludes:
acalculia NOS (R48.8)
arithmetical difficulties:
associated with a reading or spelling disorder (F81.3)
due to inadequate teaching (Z55.8)

I told my teacher in college about my problem and was told I needed to be professionally evaluated. Where can I do that? How much will it cost? I live near Salt Lake City in Utah. I couldn't get a degree because I can't pass calculus. Please help me!
Anonymous

Your college most likely has an office for students with disabilities - they are supposed to help you get tested. Because dyscalculia is so unknown, it is very possible they don’t test AT the college, but they have resources to find a place.

If all else fails, you can contact the learning disabilities association of Utah, at http://www.ldau.org/

Tests for dyscalculia

Our members are always looking for places to get tested - all over the world. Most often, people find places through other members. Here’s your chance to help - where did YOU get tested for dyscalculia?

?

That Tiny Moment Of Victory Right After You Get A Math Problem Right.
How I see numbers in every day life. Simple every day numbers most people never think about - but to me, complicated calculations demanding so much energy I get exhausted figuring out change, reading the bus schedule, going to the laundromat, reading letters from the bank, taking down phone numbers, reading an analog clock.

How I see numbers in every day life. Simple every day numbers most people never think about - but to me, complicated calculations demanding so much energy I get exhausted figuring out change, reading the bus schedule, going to the laundromat, reading letters from the bank, taking down phone numbers, reading an analog clock.

totalescapism:

I have determined that I indeed have dyscalculia.

I promise I do. 

This blog http://dyscalculic.tumblr.com/ just followed me and I creeped on it, and it is about a math dyslexia, and I have at least a minor case of it.

I can read clocks and count money and do some basic math, like addition, subtraction and division(at times). I cannot do algebra or plot graphs or even do seemingly simple equations or grasp basic teachings of math.. so I partially have it. I swear.

I HATE MATH, HAVE YOU GRASPED THIS YET GUYS, I HATE IT.

It’s very easy to self-diagnose from a list of symptoms - but it’s not necessarily always dyscalculia. Lots of things can cause problems with math, for example vision, ADD/ADHD and dyslexia. If your problems with math is something that stops you from going where you want to go in life, and you can see a lot of your issues on the list of symptoms - get tested. Even if it’s not dyscalculia, it could be something else. Either way, the only way to get proper help is to figure out what the problem is. 

mathadventures:

Extremely interesting article from The Red Tape Chronicles on MSNBC.com….just click the above title, “Math Disorder Makes Consumers Easy Prey.”

Having dyscalculia, financial situations are definitely where I find most of my problems.  As they mention, it can be anything from memorizing my PIN numbers to calculating tips or totaling the cost of items I want to purchase.  And I do HATE HATE HATE that I have to rely on people to help me out…but that’s what I have to do.  I hate the fear of losing that help.  But it’s something I just have to live with and make the best of.

That’s how a clock looked to me until my teens. 

That’s how a clock looked to me until my teens. 

My daughter is in college working on her associates degree. She is doing well in all of her classes except math, and only with timed tests. She was tested when she was much younger and they said she had issues with testing with math. We and our daughter tried to explain it to the college, we asked if she could be tested in the learning center with supervision, but without the time limit. They said no, and acted as if we were making the whole thing up. Do you have any advice?
Anonymous

We have tons of helpful members over at our main site, The Dyscalculia Forum. There’s even a good chance a member is close where you live and maybe know a local place to get help. If you’re in the US you can find local learning disability associations on this site. They know local places to get tested too, and can support you in your communication with the college. Sadly dyscalculia is still mostly unknown all over the world, BUT - it is medically approved in the same category as dyslexia, and has been for decades. Both in DSM-IV and WHO ICD-10, which is the global medical registers used by doctors and mental health professionals to diagnose.

My best advice is to become a mini-expert on dyscalculia (just what you can find online) so that you can answer questions and know what you are talking about - and contact a local association and ask for their advocacy. Good luck - and come talk on the forum if you need support.

You have Turner syndrome? It’s actually linked to dyscalculia - a lot of turner girls have dyscalculia. The same with Gerstmann’s Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disorder

cantcatchthefoxx:

3.) I think I have dyscalculia

In all seriousness I think I do.

Math has ALWAYS been my poorest subject, and NOT for lack of trying.

I got D in Algebra I, Failed Algebra II the first time, got a D the second time, and I am on my third try in a remedial college math class.

It SUCKS, because most of the time I know what I’m doing, I just get the numbers mixed up or get a simple step wrong.

I think I have failed math 92 as much as I have because I can’t use a calculator. 

I can hardly do basic math without one

Turner syndrome can cause learning difficulties, so I wouldn’t doubt it.

mathadventures:

My apologies for not writing lately.  My family just moved into a new house at the end of May and things have been crazy.  Between painting and learning how to hang curtain rods and patching holes and killing weeds, I haven’t had time for much else aside from playing with my two-and-a-half year old…

…and learning my new home address.  Most people may not find this a big deal, but when you have dyscalculia, it can be interesting.

At first, I was doing pretty well and remembering what it was but the past two times I’ve had to write it down, I’ve been drawing a blank.  And today I figured out why. 

At our old apartment, our address was 714.  To me, this wasn’t hard to memorize.  I like three digit numbers because they aren’t too hard to remember and it’s a little easier with the ‘1’ in there.  Who knows why…it’s just easier for me to visualize in my mind maybe. 

Our new address is 817.  Should be easy to remember for the same reasons…but this time I keep stumbling.  And here’s why.

Both numbers have a 1 in them.  And both numbers also have a 7 in them.  Then the ‘8’ in the new address keeps throwing me off because if you double the ‘4’ in the old address you have an ‘8’. 

All the numbers get jumbled in my head and all I know is that the ‘1’ is in the middle of the number.  So these are the possible combinations I have to go through every time I want to write down my address…

817

718

418

814

417

714

Six possible combinations.  Not too bad until you have to mentally go through them and the dyscalculia trips you up and your not sure which number you’ve already thought of before and which number you are overlooking: “714?  417?  814?  714?  418?  714?” 

I’m not entirely sure how I can work this out in my head so when I’m asked my address or have to write it down, it comes out smoothly.  I’ve never really had a problem with knowing my addresses in the past because I’ve always been able to break it down somehow and visualize it.  But the big hangup I have with my dyscalculia is when I’m asked to give a number on the spot whether it is my zip code, my area code, my phone number, what time it is, etc.  It just takes me several seconds too long to answer and whether I give the correct number or not, at that point I feel like everyone is looking at me oddly. 

I suppose that I’ll just have to keep working on remembering that number and maybe carry it in my pocket too as a cheat sheet in case I really get stuck.  Embarrassing, but I guess I’ll do what I have to do.

cognizingconsciousness:

Dyscalculia Affects Roughly as Many People as Dyslexia
Students who struggle to learn mathematics may have a neurocognitive disorder that inhibits the acquisition of basic numerical and arithmetic concepts, according to a new paper. Specialized teaching for individuals with dyscalculia, the mathematical equivalent of dyslexia, should be made widely available in mainstream education, according to a review of current research published in the journalScience.
Although just as common as dyslexia, with an estimated prevalence of up to 7% of the population, dyscalculia has been neglected as a disorder of cognitive development. However, a world-wide effort by scientists and educators has established the essential neural network that supports arithmetic, and revealed abnormalities in this network in the brains of dyscalulic learners.
Neuroscience research shows what kind of help is most needed — strengthening simple number concepts. This can be achieved with appropriate specially-designed teaching schemes, which can be supported by game-like software that adapts to the learner’s current level of competence.
Professor Brian Butterworth, co-author of the paper and a member of the Centre for Educational Neuroscience (CEN) from the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, said: “Dyscalculia is at least as much of a handicap for individuals as dyslexia and a very heavy burden on the state, with the estimated cost to the UK of low numeracy standing at £2.4 billion.”
“Nevertheless, there are only cursory references to the disorder on the Department of Education website — no indications are offered for help either for learners, teachers or parents. It’s as if the government does not want to acknowledge its existence.”
Like dyslexia, dyscalculia is a condition we are born with, and may be heritable in many or most cases. Research from twins and special populations suggests that an arithmetical disability has a large genetic component, but the genes responsible have not yet been located.
Professor Diana Laurillard, another co-author and a member of CEN from the Institute of Education (IOE), University of London, said: “Just because dyscalculia is inherited it does not mean that there is nothing that can be done about it. As with dyslexia, specialized teaching can help. At the IOE we have developed software resources specifically to help children with dyscalculia, based on brain research showing exactly what problems the brain is having.”
One of the main challenges of the effort to understand dyscalculia, is for scientists from these very different disciplines to understand each others’ methods and results. The creation of interdisciplinary and inter-institutional centres to promote joint work, such as the Centre for Educational Neuroscience established by UCL (University College London); the Institute of Education, University of London and Birkbeck University of London, aims to address this challenge.
Professor Laurillard added: “Results from neuroscience and developmental psychology tell us that dyscalculic learners need to practice far more number manipulation tasks than mainstream learners. Adaptive, game-like programs that focus on making numbers meaningful, emulating what skilled SEN teachers do, can help learners practice beyond the classroom and build the basic understanding they need to tackle arithmetic.”
What is dyscalculia?
Examples of common indicators of dyscalculia are (i) carrying out simple number comparison and addition tasks by counting, often using fingers, well beyond the age when it is normal, and (ii) finding approximate estimation tasks difficult. Individuals identified as dyscalculic behave differently from their mainstream peers, for example:
To say which is the larger of two playing cards showing 5 and 8, they count all the symbols on each card.
To place a playing card of 8 in sequence between a 3 and a 9 they count up spaces between the two to identify where the 8 should be placed.
To count down from 10 they count up from 1 to 10, then 1 to 9, etc.
To count up from 70 in tens, they say ‘70, 80, 90, 100, 200, 300…’
They estimate the height of a normal room as ‘200 feet?’
(SD)

cognizingconsciousness:

Dyscalculia Affects Roughly as Many People as Dyslexia

Students who struggle to learn mathematics may have a neurocognitive disorder that inhibits the acquisition of basic numerical and arithmetic concepts, according to a new paper. Specialized teaching for individuals with dyscalculia, the mathematical equivalent of dyslexia, should be made widely available in mainstream education, according to a review of current research published in the journalScience.

Although just as common as dyslexia, with an estimated prevalence of up to 7% of the population, dyscalculia has been neglected as a disorder of cognitive development. However, a world-wide effort by scientists and educators has established the essential neural network that supports arithmetic, and revealed abnormalities in this network in the brains of dyscalulic learners.

Neuroscience research shows what kind of help is most needed — strengthening simple number concepts. This can be achieved with appropriate specially-designed teaching schemes, which can be supported by game-like software that adapts to the learner’s current level of competence.

Professor Brian Butterworth, co-author of the paper and a member of the Centre for Educational Neuroscience (CEN) from the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, said: “Dyscalculia is at least as much of a handicap for individuals as dyslexia and a very heavy burden on the state, with the estimated cost to the UK of low numeracy standing at £2.4 billion.”

“Nevertheless, there are only cursory references to the disorder on the Department of Education website — no indications are offered for help either for learners, teachers or parents. It’s as if the government does not want to acknowledge its existence.”

Like dyslexia, dyscalculia is a condition we are born with, and may be heritable in many or most cases. Research from twins and special populations suggests that an arithmetical disability has a large genetic component, but the genes responsible have not yet been located.

Professor Diana Laurillard, another co-author and a member of CEN from the Institute of Education (IOE), University of London, said: “Just because dyscalculia is inherited it does not mean that there is nothing that can be done about it. As with dyslexia, specialized teaching can help. At the IOE we have developed software resources specifically to help children with dyscalculia, based on brain research showing exactly what problems the brain is having.”

One of the main challenges of the effort to understand dyscalculia, is for scientists from these very different disciplines to understand each others’ methods and results. The creation of interdisciplinary and inter-institutional centres to promote joint work, such as the Centre for Educational Neuroscience established by UCL (University College London); the Institute of Education, University of London and Birkbeck University of London, aims to address this challenge.

Professor Laurillard added: “Results from neuroscience and developmental psychology tell us that dyscalculic learners need to practice far more number manipulation tasks than mainstream learners. Adaptive, game-like programs that focus on making numbers meaningful, emulating what skilled SEN teachers do, can help learners practice beyond the classroom and build the basic understanding they need to tackle arithmetic.”

What is dyscalculia?

Examples of common indicators of dyscalculia are (i) carrying out simple number comparison and addition tasks by counting, often using fingers, well beyond the age when it is normal, and (ii) finding approximate estimation tasks difficult. Individuals identified as dyscalculic behave differently from their mainstream peers, for example:

  • To say which is the larger of two playing cards showing 5 and 8, they count all the symbols on each card.
  • To place a playing card of 8 in sequence between a 3 and a 9 they count up spaces between the two to identify where the 8 should be placed.
  • To count down from 10 they count up from 1 to 10, then 1 to 9, etc.
  • To count up from 70 in tens, they say ‘70, 80, 90, 100, 200, 300…’
  • They estimate the height of a normal room as ‘200 feet?’

(SD)

My mother doesn’t understand my strategy for remembering the order of numbers.

toranseislost:

My mother doesn’t understand my strategy for remembering the order of numbers. But every number has a personality. Also a parent. Also a child (unless you’re one, then you’re too young to be a parent.) And every combination of numbers has a story. And if it doesn’t have a story, I will get them mixed up. Children are half, parents are double. 2 is the child of 4, 4 the child of 8, etc. So today I have to remember to pick up the 363 bus. One parent on an outing with two children, holding their hands on either side.

It works, okay??